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Set up persistent storage

If you host Label Studio Enterprise in the cloud, you want to set up persistent storage for uploaded task data, user images, and more in the same cloud service as your deployment.

Follow the steps relevant for your deployment. If you use Docker Compose, select the cloud service you want to use as persistent storage:

Set up Amazon S3

Set up Amazon S3 as the persistent storage for Label Studio Enterprise hosted in AWS or using Docker Compose.

Create an S3 bucket

Start by creating an S3 bucket following the Amazon Simple Storage Service User Guide steps.

If you want to secure the data stored in the S3 bucket at rest, you can set up default server-side encryption for Amazon S3 buckets following the steps in the Amazon Simple Storage Service User Guide.

Configure the S3 bucket

After you create an S3 bucket, set up the necessary IAM permissions to grant Label Studio Enterprise access to your bucket. There are four ways that you can manage access to your S3 bucket:

Select the relevant tab and follow the steps for your desired option:

To set up an IAM role using this method, you must have a configured and provisioned OIDC provider for your cluster. See Create an IAM OIDC provider for your cluster in the Amazon EKS User Guide.

  1. Follow the steps to create an IAM role and policy for your service account in the Amazon EKS User Guide.
  2. Use the following IAM Policy, replacing <YOUR_S3_BUCKET> with the name of your bucket:
{
  "Version": "2012-10-17",
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Action": [
        "s3:ListBucket"
      ],
      "Resource": [
        "arn:aws:s3:::<YOUR_S3_BUCKET>"
      ]
    },
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Action": [
        "s3:PutObject",
        "s3:GetObject",
        "s3:DeleteObject"
      ],
      "Resource": [
        "arn:aws:s3:::<YOUR_S3_BUCKET>/*"
      ]
    }
  ]
}
  1. Create an IAM role as a Web Identity using the cluster OIDC provider as the identity provider:
    1. Create a new Role from your IAM Console.
    2. Select the Web identity Tab.
    3. In the Identity Provider drop-down, select the OpenID Connect provider URL of your EKS and sts.amazonaws.com as the Audience.
    4. Attach the newly created permission to the Role and name it.
    5. Retrieve the Role arn for the next step.
  2. After you create an IAM role, add it as an annotation in your lse-values.yaml file.
    Optionally, you can choose a folder by specifying folder (default is "" or omit this argument):
global:
  persistence:
    enabled: true
    type: s3
    config:
      s3:
        bucket: "<YOUR_BUCKET_NAME>"
        region: "<YOUR_BUCKET_REGION>"
        folder: ""
app:
  serviceAccount:
    annotations:
      eks.amazonaws.com/role-arn: arn:aws:iam::<ACCOUNT_ID>:role/<ROLE_NAME_FROM_STEP_3>

rqworker:
  serviceAccount:
    annotations:
      eks.amazonaws.com/role-arn: arn:aws:iam::<ACCOUNT_ID>:role/<ROLE_NAME_FROM_STEP_3>
  1. Create an IAM user with Programmatic access. See Creating an IAM user in your AWS account in the AWS Identity and Access Management User Guide.
  2. When creating the user, for the Set permissions option, choose to Attach existing policies directly.
  3. Select Create policy and attach the following policy, replacing <YOUR_S3_BUCKET> with the name of your bucket:
{
  "Version": "2012-10-17",
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Action": [
        "s3:ListBucket"
      ],
      "Resource": [
        "arn:aws:s3:::<YOUR_S3_BUCKET>"
      ]
    },
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Action": [
        "s3:PutObject",
        "s3:GetObject",
        "s3:DeleteObject"
      ],
      "Resource": [
        "arn:aws:s3:::<YOUR_S3_BUCKET>/*"
      ]
    }
  ]
}
  1. After you create the user, save the username and access key somewhere secure.
  2. Update your lse-values.yaml file with your newly-created access key ID and secret key as <YOUR_ACCESS_KEY_ID> and <YOUR_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY>.
    Optionally, you can choose a folder by specifying folder (default is "" or omit this argument):
global:
  persistence:
    enabled: true
    type: s3
    config:
      s3:
        accessKey: "<YOUR_ACCESS_KEY_ID>"
        secretKey: "<YOUR_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY>"
        bucket: "<YOUR_BUCKET_NAME>"
        region: "<YOUR_BUCKET_REGION>"
        folder: ""

Optionally, you can use already existing Kubernetes secret and a key

  1. Create a Kubernetes secret with your AWS access keys:
kubectl create secret generic <YOUR_SECRET_NAME> --from-literal=accesskey=<YOUR_ACCESS_KEY_ID> --from-literal=secretkey=<YOUR_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY>
  1. Update your lse-values.yaml file with your newly-created kubernetes secret:
global:
  persistence:
    enabled: true
    type: s3
    config:
      s3:
        accessKeyExistingSecret: "<YOUR_SECRET_NAME>"
        accessKeyExistingSecretKey: "accesskey"
        secretKeyExistingSecret: "<YOUR_SECRET_NAME>"
        secretKeyExistingSecretKey: "secretkey"
        bucket: "<YOUR_BUCKET_NAME>"
        region: "<YOUR_BUCKET_REGION>"

To create an IAM role without using OIDC in EKS, follow these steps.

  1. In the AWS console UI, go to EKS > Clusters > YOUR_CLUSTER_NAME > Node Group.
  2. Select the name of YOUR_NODE_GROUP with Label Studio Enterprise deployed.
  3. On the Details page, locate and select the option for Node IAM Role ARN and choose to Attach existing policies directly.
  4. Select Create policy and attach the following policy, replacing <YOUR_S3_BUCKET> with the name of your bucket:
{
  "Version": "2012-10-17",
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Action": [
        "s3:ListBucket"
      ],
      "Resource": [
        "arn:aws:s3:::<YOUR_S3_BUCKET>"
      ]
    },
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Action": [
        "s3:PutObject",
        "s3:GetObject",
        "s3:DeleteObject"
      ],
      "Resource": [
        "arn:aws:s3:::<YOUR_S3_BUCKET>/*"
      ]
    }
  ]
}
  1. After you add an IAM policy, configure your lse-values.yaml file.
    Optionally, you can choose a folder by specifying folder (default is "" or omit this argument):
global:
  persistence:
    enabled: true
    type: s3
    config:
      s3:
        bucket: "<YOUR_BUCKET_NAME>"
        region: "<YOUR_BUCKET_REGION>"
        folder: ""
  1. Create an IAM user with Programmatic access. See Creating an IAM user in your AWS account in the AWS Identity and Access Management User Guide.
  2. When creating the user, for the Set permissions option, choose to Attach existing policies directly.
  3. Select Create policy and attach the following policy, replacing <YOUR_S3_BUCKET> with the name of your bucket:
{
  "Version": "2012-10-17",
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Action": [
        "s3:ListBucket"
      ],
      "Resource": [
        "arn:aws:s3:::<YOUR_S3_BUCKET>"
      ]
    },
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Action": [
        "s3:PutObject",
        "s3:GetObject",
        "s3:DeleteObject"
      ],
      "Resource": [
        "arn:aws:s3:::<YOUR_S3_BUCKET>/*"
      ]
    }
  ]
}
  1. After you create the user, save the username and access key somewhere secure.
  2. Update your env.list file, replacing <YOUR_ACCESS_KEY_ID> and <YOUR_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY> with your newly-created access key ID and secret key. Optionally, you can specify a folder using STORAGE_AWS_FOLDER (default is "" or omit this argument):
STORAGE_TYPE=s3
STORAGE_AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID="<YOUR_ACCESS_KEY_ID>"
STORAGE_AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY="<YOUR_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY>"
STORAGE_AWS_BUCKET_NAME="<YOUR_BUCKET_NAME>"
STORAGE_AWS_REGION_NAME="<YOUR_BUCKET_REGION>"
STORAGE_AWS_FOLDER=""

Set up Google Cloud Storage

Set up Google Cloud Storage (GCS) as the persistent storage for Label Studio Enterprise hosted in Google Cloud Platform (GCP) or Docker Compose.

Create a GCS bucket

  1. Start by creating a bucket. See Creating storage buckets in the Google Cloud Storage guide. For example, a bucket called heartex-example-bucket-123456.
  2. When choosing the access control method for the bucket, choose uniform access control.
  3. Create an IAM Service Account. See Creating and managing service accounts in the Google Cloud Storage guide.
  4. Select the predefined Storage Object Admin IAM role to add to the service account so that the account can create, access, and delete objects in the bucket.
  5. Add a condition to the role that restricts the role to access only objects that belong to the bucket you created. You can add a condition in one of two ways:
    • Select Add Condition when setting up the service account IAM role, then use the Condition Builder to specify the following values:
      • Condition type: Name
      • Operator: Starts with
      • Value: projects/_/buckets/heartex-example-bucket-123456
    • Or, use a Common Expression Language (CEL) to specify an IAM condition. For example, set the following: resource.name.startsWith('projects/_/buckets/heartex-example-bucket-123456'). See CEL for Conditions in Overview of IAM Conditions in the Google Cloud Storage guide.

Configure the GCS bucket

You can connect Label Studio Enterprise to your GCS bucket using Workload Identity or Access keys.

After you create a bucket and set up IAM permissions, connect Label Studio Enterprise to your GCS bucket. There are three ways that you can connect to your bucket:

Make sure that Workload Identity is enabled on your GKE cluster and that you meet the necessary prerequisites. See Using Workload Identity in the Google Kubernetes Engine guide.

  1. Set up the following environment variables, specifying the service account you created as the GCP_SA variable, and replacing the other references in <> as needed:
GCP_SA=<Service-Account-You-Created>
APP_SA="serviceAccount:<GCP_PROJECT_ID>.svc.id.goog[<K8S_NAMESPACE>/<HELM_RELEASE_NAME>-lse-app]"
WORKER_SA="serviceAccount:<GCP_PROJECT_ID>.svc.id.goog[<K8S_NAMESPACE>/<HELM_RELEASE_NAME>-lse-rqworker]"
  1. Create an IAM policy binding between the Kubernetes service account on your cluster and the GCS service account you created, allowing the K8s service account for the Label Studio Enterprise app and the related rqworkers to impersonate the other service account. From the command line, run the following:
gcloud iam service-accounts add-iam-policy-binding ${GCP_SA} \
    --role roles/iam.workloadIdentityUser \
    --member "${APP_SA}"
gcloud iam service-accounts add-iam-policy-binding ${GCP_SA} \
    --role roles/iam.workloadIdentityUser \
    --member "${WORKER_SA}"
  1. After binding the service accounts, update your lse-values.yaml file to include the values for the service account and other configurations. Update the projectID, bucket, and replace the<GCP_SERVICE_ACCOUNT> with the relevant values for your deployment.
    Optionally, you can choose a folder by specifying folder (default is "" or omit this argument):
global:
  persistence:
    enabled: true
    type: gcs
    config:
      gcs:
        projectID: "<YOUR_PROJECT_ID>"
        bucket: "<YOUR_BUCKET_NAME>"
        folder: ""
app:
  serviceAccount:
    annotations:
      iam.gke.io/gcp-service-account: "<GCP_SERVICE_ACCOUNT>"

rqworker:
  serviceAccount:
    annotations:
      iam.gke.io/gcp-service-account: "<GCP_SERVICE_ACCOUNT>"

You can use a service account key that you create, or if you already have a Kubernetes secret and key, follow the steps below to use those.

Create a new service account key

  1. Create a service account key from the UI and download the JSON. Follow the steps for Creating and managing service account keys in the Google Cloud Identity and Access Management guide.
  2. After downloading the JSON for the service account key, update or create references to the JSON, your projectID, and your bucket in your lse-values.yaml file.
    Optionally, you can choose a folder by specifying folder (default is "" or omit this argument):
global:
  persistence:
    enabled: true
    type: gcs
    config:
      gcs:
        projectID: "<YOUR_PROJECT_ID>"
        applicationCredentialsJSON: "<YOUR_JSON>"
        bucket: "<YOUR_BUCKET_NAME>"
        folder: ""

Use an existing Kubernetes secret and key

  1. Create a Kubernetes secret with your GCS service account JSON file, replacing <PATH_TO_JSON> with the path to the service account JSON file:
kubectl create secret generic <YOUR_SECRET_NAME> --from-file=key_json=<PATH_TO_JSON>
  1. Update your lse-values.yaml file with your newly-created Kubernetes secret:
global:
   persistence:
      enabled: true
      type: gcs
      config:
         gcs:
            projectID: "<YOUR_PROJECT_ID>"
            applicationCredentialsJSONExistingSecret: "<YOUR_SECRET_NAME>"
            applicationCredentialsJSONExistingSecretKey: "key_json"
            bucket: "<YOUR_BUCKET_NAME>"
  1. Create a service account key from the UI and download the JSON. Follow the steps for Creating and managing service account keys in the Google Cloud Identity and Access Management guide.
  2. After downloading the JSON for the service account key, update or create references to the JSON, your projectID, and your bucket in your env.list file.
    Optionally, you can choose a folder by specifying STORAGE_GCS_FOLDER (default is "" or omit this argument):
STORAGE_TYPE=gcs
STORAGE_GCS_BUCKET_NAME="<YOUR_BUCKET_NAME>"
STORAGE_GCS_PROJECT_ID="<YOUR_PROJECT_ID>"
STORAGE_GCS_FOLDER=""
GOOGLE_APPLICATION_CREDENTIALS="/opt/heartex/secrets/key.json"
  1. Place the downloaded JSON file from step 1 in the same directory as your env.list file.
  2. Append the following entry in docker-compose.yml file as the path for app.volumes:
- ./service-account-file.json:/opt/heartex/secrets/key.json:ro

Set up Microsoft Azure Storage

Create a Microsoft Azure Storage container to use as persistent storage with Label Studio Enterprise.

Create a Storage container

  1. Create an Azure storage account. See Create a storage account in the Microsoft Azure product documentation.

    Make sure that you set Stock Keeping Unit (SKU) to Premium_LRS and the kind parameter to BlockBlobStorage. This configuration results in storage that uses solid state drives (SSDs) rather than standard hard disk drives (HDDs). If you set this parameter to an HDD-based storage option, your instance might be too slow and could malfunction.

  2. Find the generated key in the Storage accounts > Access keys section in the Azure Portal or by running the following command:
az storage account keys list --account-name=${STORAGE_ACCOUNT}
  1. Create a storage container within your storage account by following the steps to Upload, download, and list blobs with the Azure portal in the Microsoft Azure product documentation, or run the following command:
az storage container create --name <YOUR_CONTAINER_NAME> \
          --account-name <YOUR_STORAGE_ACCOUNT> \
          --account-key "<YOUR_STORAGE_KEY>"

Configure the Azure container

You can connect Label Studio Enterprise to your Azure container using account keys in Kubernetes or account keys in Docker Compose. Choose the option relevant to your Label Studio Enterprise deployment.

Update your lse-values.yaml file with the YOUR_CONTAINER_NAME, YOUR_STORAGE_ACCOUNT, and YOUR_STORAGE_KEY that you created.
Optionally, you can choose a folder by specifying folder (default is "" or omit this argument):

global:
  persistence:
    enabled: true
    type: azure
    config:
      azure:
        storageAccountName: "<YOUR_STORAGE_ACCOUNT>"
        storageAccountKey: "<YOUR_STORAGE_KEY>"
        containerName: "<YOUR_CONTAINER_NAME>"
        folder: ""

If you have an existing key, you can use that instead to create a Kubernetes secret.

  1. Create a Kubernetes secret with your Azure access key:
kubectl create secret generic <YOUR_SECRET_NAME> --from-literal=storageaccountname=<YOUR_STORAGE_ACCOUNT> --from-literal=storageaccountkey=<YOUR_STORAGE_KEY>
  1. Update your lse-values.yaml file with your newly-created Kubernetes secret:
global:
   persistence:
      enabled: true
      type: azure
      config:
         azure:
            storageAccountNameExistingSecret: "<YOUR_SECRET_NAME>"
            storageAccountNameExistingSecretKey: "storageaccountname"
            storageAccountKeyExistingSecret: "<YOUR_SECRET_NAME>"
            storageAccountKeyExistingSecretKey: "storageaccountkey"
            containerName: "<YOUR_CONTAINER_NAME>"

Update your env.list file with the YOUR_CONTAINER_NAME, YOUR_STORAGE_ACCOUNT, and YOUR_STORAGE_KEY that you created.
Optionally, you can choose a folder by specifying STORAGE_AZURE_FOLDER (default is "" or omit this argument):

STORAGE_TYPE=azure
STORAGE_AZURE_ACCOUNT_NAME="<YOUR_STORAGE_ACCOUNT>"
STORAGE_AZURE_ACCOUNT_KEY="<YOUR_STORAGE_KEY>"
STORAGE_AZURE_CONTAINER_NAME="<YOUR_CONTAINER_NAME>"
STORAGE_AZURE_FOLDER=""